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Exploring Chicago History with Vintage Postcards





Welcome to my blog that examines Chicago history by viewing vintage postcards. I am a journalist, amateur philatelist and postcard collector. Deltiology is the study of postcards. My blog posts dive into the history of deltiology with a focus on Chicago. Most of the postcards featured here are from my personal collection. My wife, a professional book editor, also edits these posts. One of my first loves was to view vintage postcards of this amazing city and read about its unique history. I now want to share these beautiful images and stories with you. Please feel free to share your comments and stories. You can also email me at josephruzich@gmail.com.


Published by Curt Teich & Co., Inc.

Comments

  1. These postcards and their accompanying explanations are incredibly interesting. The website has a clean design, crisp photos, and the write ups are first rate. Well done! Looking forward to the next cards.

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    1. Thank you very much! Please click on the "follow me" button on the website and also include your email in the subscribe area if you can. I am having trouble getting readers so please share the website with others. Thank You, Joe Ruzich.

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